S3P1. Students will investigate how heat is produced and the effects of heating and cooling, and will understand a change in temperature indicates a change in heat.

a. Categorize ways to produce heat energy such as burning, rubbing (friction), and mixing one thing with another.

b. Investigate how insulation affects heating and cooling.

c. Investigate the transfer of heat energy from the sun to various materials.

d. Use thermometers to measure the changes in temperatures of water samples (hot, warm, cold) over time.



Resources


Testing Insulators: Ice Cubes in a Box (S3P1.b) www.teachersdomain.org You will want to create an account so you will have full access to the resources here.
This video and investigation allows students to explore ways to insulate an ice cube to more effectively slow the melting of an ice cube. They construct containers for their ice cubes using materials like cardboard, newspaper, aluminum foil, and tape. These containers create an insulating environment designed to keep heat away from the ice cube.

Heat Transfer (S3P1.a/c) www.teachersdomain.org You will want to create an account so you will have full access to the resources here.
This interactive illustrates heat transfer. Also, check out the discussion questions with this activity. These could be used in the science notebook. (What would happen if a person who is wearing a heavy winter jacket were to place a thermometer inside the jacket next to his or her skin? What would happen if we took the same jacket, after it had been hanging in a closet, and placed a thermometer inside?)

What Does a Conductor Do? (SP31.b) Wonderopolis
Short video clip to illustrate how a wet suit insulates the body. There is also a good explanation of conductors

Can You Really Cook an Egg on the Sidewalk? (SP31.c) Wonderopolis
This video demonstrates whether you can really cook an egg on the sidewalk on a hot day and explains that sidewalks are poor conductors of heat.

Cooking Cookies with Solar Power (SP31.c) www.teachersdomain.org You will want to create an account so you will have full access to the resources here.
This video and investigation is a good follow up to the Can you Really Cook an Egg on the Sidewalk? activity since it shows ways to design a cooker that will harness more heat. This investigation tests two homemade solar cookers to determine which one can cook a "s'more" faster.